Back

Moche Vessels

Moche vessel, ceramic, 33 x 17 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

Moche vessel, ceramic, 33 x 17 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

© Instituto Nacional de Cultura
Moche vessel, ceramic, 35 x 18 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

Moche vessel, ceramic, 35 x 18 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

© Instituto Nacional de Cultura
Moche vessel, ceramic, 29 x 18 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

Moche vessel, ceramic, 29 x 18 cm, Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú

© Instituto Nacional de Cultura

Notice

Material
Ceramics
Type
Utensils and vessels
Details
Moche vessels are generally found in tombs located in the northern, coastal departments of Lambayeque and La Libertad, and in the north of the Ancash department, Peru. The most important items date from between 200 and 700 AD. Best-known Moche or Mochica ritual ceramics include globular vessels portraying painted figurative scenes and vessels shaped in the form of naturalistic representations of human figures, animals and scenes. The two predominant colors are cream and red-brown or brick red. Globular vessels feature stirrup-spouts over the body whereas in the other vessels stirrup-spouts are located in the rear or sides. Although they vary in size, vessels average 35 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter. Stirrup-spout globular vessels feature a smooth surface and painted decoration although sometimes they are worked in low relief over a cream-colored background. Decoration consists of a wide range of figurative scenes dealing with activities such as war, ceremonies, hunting, fishing and sacrifices. These images portray warriors, priests and a few women. Items from later periods also feature geometric decorations such as lines, curves, spirals, triangles, ladder-like motifs and zigzags. Vessels in the shape of figures portray warriors with weapons, prisoners with tied hands, mythological characters with feline fangs. They also feature erotic scenes or sacrifices. Portrait jars in the shape of a human head with realistic facial features are also well-known. Cream and red-brown vessels in the shape of animals, sea creatures, vegetables, temples and mountains are extremely common. Some of these are entirely black. Moche vessels are the best-known and most valued but other similar vessels in the shape of figures, featuring brighter colors, exist. They are issued from the Virú, Recua, and Salinar cultures from the different valleys of the northern coast of Peru and the southern coast of Ecuador. They usually date from earlier periods or are contemporary with Moche vessels.
Red List
Red List of Latin American Cultural Objects at Risk
Countries
Peru | Ecuador
Period
Pre-Columbian